The First Year of Life 6 to 9 Months

There is a lot of learning going on. Baby continues to grow and gain weight. His feeding/wake schedule may change because he has hit a growth spurt and he is hungry. Ask your medical provider when to begin to introduce solid foods. It is also during this time baby begins to teethe. This could affect his appetite and his sleep routine. Most babies this age are starting to crawl, You might be surprised at how be maneuvers himself about.

Safety – If you have not yet taken a floor level search of your home – now is the time! Do you have safety plugs in unused outlets? Tie up blind cords.
Where do you keep cleaning supplies? Can they be moved to an upper cabinet? Cabinet locks and “bumper pads” for sharp corners on your list? What about stairs? Need a safety gate? Emergency information on your
phone is great, but what if something happens and you do not have the
phone or are unable to use it? Please create an emergency information sheet. List on this sheet emergency contact numbers, medical provider contact, any medications baby is taking, Dad’s work number and maybe even the number of a neighbor who would help in an emergency. Keep this in a protective plastic sheet on the fridge.

Teething – Babies may begin to teethe between 4 to 7 months, some later.
Teething may be painful, but it doesn’t usually make baby sick. Contact
your healthcare provider if baby has diarrhea, vomiting, rashes on the body, a high fever, or cough and congestion. These are not normal signs of teething. www.webmd.com
* Researching on teething information I learned that the liquid filled teethers, and teething necklaces should not be used. Numbing gel products,
containing benzocaine like “orajel” should not be used on children under two years of age. Learn more at www.mouthhealth.org a web sight of the American Dental Association.

Baby is learning ways to get from one place to another. He is curious and eager to explore. He may crawl, scoot and pull to a stand. He will look for a toy that is hidden. He can drop things intentionally to see what happens. He is also watching your response to this activity. *Remember this activity is developmentally appropriate for this time period.

Stranger Anxiety – Your baby now understands the difference between you and a stranger. You can help baby get comfortable. Baby will watch you for cues, show how him that you like and trust the new person.

Separation Anxiety – Your baby will likely cry when you leave to persuade you to stay. I encourage you not to sneek away. Tell baby good=bye and that you will be back to get him, then leave. If you are concerned you can always call the caregiver to check on baby. I encouraged parents to have a picture of themselves and tape it to a spot baby can see.

Stress – It is important to understand that babies are tuned in to our feelings. They know when we are happy or upset. Even if baby is asleep
angry voices and conflict can raise stress levels of babies as young as 6 months.

God Bless you and this young life you are caring for.

Trudy

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.