The First Year of Life – 3 1/2 to 5 1/2 Months

From helpless newborn to active toddler takes only twelve short months.
It is important to remember that each baby in an individual and their progress in reaching milestones of development is unique to the individual child.

Tummy Time – When baby is alert and ready for play introduce this activity. It can be done on the floor with baby on his tummy. If baby does not enjoy this activity you can try placing him on your chest. A few minutes at a time doing this activity with you will help build baby’s neck muscles.

By 3 ½ months: Baby will turn his head to locate a sound. He will respond when he hears his name. You’re getting a little closer to a solid sleep routine. Rest when baby does and know that waking several times at night to feed is completely normal. After four months of age babies will likely sleep 12 to 15 hours a day including naps.

Baby development four to 51/2 months:
Baby is learning to reach out and manipulate. They are discovering their hands and their voice. Baby will reach out to grasp, swat and manipulate
objects. They will babble and laugh. The game of “Peek-A-Boo” is a great way to help baby learn that things exist even when we don’t see them. Baby is also learning to sit up.

Safety:
Baby is learning to roll over. Have a play mat on the floor or place baby where he will be safe if he rolls over. Baby is using his hands and mouth to explore things. It is vitally important to keep small items that might be a choking hazard away from baby. If an item fits through the cardboard toilet paper tube it is too small for baby to play with.

Ear infections:
www.nidcd.nihgiv/health/ear-infections-children
National Institute on Deafness and Communicative Disorders
If you suspect your child may have an ear infection, please contact
your medical provider immediately. The peak time for ear infections is 6 to 18 months. An ear infection is an inflammation of the middle ear, usually caused by bacteria, that occurs when fluid builds up behind the eardrum. Children are more likely than adults to get ear infections. The eustachian tubes are smaller and more level in children than adults. This makes it more difficult for fluid to drain out of the ear, even under normal conditions. Also, a child’s immune system isn’t as effective as an adult’s because it is still developing.
Currently the best way to prevent ear infections is to reduce the risk factors associated with them. Follow your medical provider schedule for immunizations. Studies have shown that vaccinated children get far fewer ear infections. Avoid exposing your baby to cigarette smoke. Babies who are around smokers have more ear infections. Do not let your baby drink from a bottle while lying down as this may allow small amounts of formula to enter the eustachian tube and cause blockage.
www.webmd.com

God bless,
Trudy

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